Two people next to a truck with trees in it.

Surrey residents can buy quality trees at an affordable price to help grow the urban forest.

Surrey Parks is hosting four tree sales in 2022. There are two sales in the spring and two sales in the fall.

New trees planted on your property help the environment, provide shade and insulation for your home, increase your property value, and make your neighbourhood more livable. Each tree planted contributes to growing the urban forest and increases tree canopy coverage across the City.

Purchases are made online and then later picked up from the Surrey Operations Centre. Additional details below.  

Upcoming Dates  

Thank you for your interest in the tree sale. Our April tree sale is now sold out. Purchased trees can be picked up on May 15. Tree pickup location is at the Surrey Operations Centre (6651 148 Street). Two additional sales will be announced later this year.

Sale dates for each event will be posted on this page, through social media, and our news and updates program.

Eligibility & Limits

  • This program is for private properties in Surrey.

  • Trees are only available to Surrey residents.

  • Maximum three per person, six per household per sale.

  • Trees average 2 to 3 cm caliper size. Most do not meet the size requirements as replacement trees, and we are unable to guarantee the size of specific trees in advance of purchase.

  • Most trees are in 5-gallon pots and vary between 6 to 12 feet tall. Ensure your vehicle can accommodate this.

How to Buy

All trees are $20.

  1. Visit the online tree store on sale day.

  2. Select up to three trees per order. Households purchasing over three trees will have two separate orders.

  3. Proceed to your cart and choose your pickup time (date is pre-selected).

  4. Enter your payment details and check out.

Online Tree Store

You will receive an emailed confirmation of your order as well as a reminder prior to the pick up date at the Surrey Operations Centre (6651 148 St, Surrey, BC V3S 3C7).

Trees are considered final sale after pickup.

Tree List

Tree varieties vary by sale. Photos may not depict exact variety.

Apple – Ambrosia 

Small tree, grows to 20 feet. Fruit is sweet and tender. Produces beautiful spring flowers.  

Apple.
Photo & information credit: NetPS Plant Finder 

 

Apple – Northern red spy  

A vigorous tree with large, thin skinned, greenish-yellow fruit that is flushed and striped red; yellow to white flesh is crisp, juicy, and slightly sweet; stores well; ideal for home landscapes, needs well-drained soil and full sun. These apples are commonly used for baking or eating fresh off the tree. Will grow to a height and spread of about 20 feet. 

Apple tree.
Photo & information credit: NetPS Plant Finder 

 

Apple – Paula red  

This tree produces sweet crisp apples. Paula red needs a pollinator to produce fruit and the apples ripen in September. Grows to about 30 feet in height. Fruit is commonly used for cooking.  

Three apples on a branch.
Information credit: Silver Creek Nursery

 

Apple – Royal Gala  

Small tree, grows to 20 feet. Produces large round apples. Sweet and juicy, they are good for fresh eating and baking. 

Apple tree.
Photo & information credit: NetPS Plant Finder 

 

Apple – Spartan  

A very hardy and popular, red-streaked apple with a greenish blush, good tart flavor, keeps well; eating apples are high maintenance and need a second pollinator; the perfect combination of accent and fruit tree, needs well-drained soil and full sun. They are used for baking, cooking, or eating fresh. The tree will grow to a height and spread of 20 feet with the apples ready to pick in mid-fall.  

Apple tree.
Photo & information credit: NetPS Plant Finder 

 

Apple – Sunrise  

A unique apple tree as it is one of the earliest varieties harvested every year. It has a pleasant balance of sweet and tart taste, incredibly juicy with a crisp outside. 

Apples on a tree.

Apricot – Harglow  

Known for producing many fruits and thrives in environments that have late frosts. The Apricot fruit is sweet, firm, and medium size. Fruits are ready in July. Grows to 15-25 feet high with a spread of up to 25 feet. 

Apricot tree.
Information credit: Rain Tree Nursery  

 

Apricot – Puget gold  

Known for producing many fruits and thrives in environments that have late frosts. The Apricot fruit is sweet, firm, and medium size. Bright orange fruit that are exceptional for fresh eating or preserving. Fruits are ready in July. Grows to 15-25 feet high with a spread of up to 25 feet. 

Apricot.
Photo & information credit: NetPS Plant Finder 

 

Plum – Brooks 

Excellent eating prune. Plums from this tree store well after being picked. Used for canning, drying, or eating fresh. The maximum height and spread of this tree is 15 feet.   

Purple plums on a branch.

 

Plum – Early Gold 

Needs full sun. Produces round yellow fruits that are sweet and tangy. It ripens in August, and it is best eaten fresh.  

Yellow plums on a branch.

 

Plum – French Prune  

Self-fertile, mild flavoured, deep reddish black plum. Great for canning or drying. The height and spread of this tree reaches 15 feet. Needs full sun. 

Purple plums on a branch.

 

Plum – Italian Prune 

Small tree, grows to 15 feet. Produces deep purple round fruits that are versatile for eating, drying, cooking, and baking.  

Dark purple plums.

 

Plum – Yellow Egg 

These plums are large, oval shaped, and yellow. Very sweet. Commonly used in cooking and eating fresh. Can grow to about 16 feet tall.  

Yellow plums on a branch.

Cherry – Crimson Passion 

Small with beautiful bright red cherries with a sweet taste and juicy texture. Also enjoy a showy flourish of fragrant white flowers in mid spring. Grows to 10’.  

Cherries on a branch.

 

Cherry – Stella 

Suited for small gardens due to their small stature. Self-fertile. White blossoms in spring give way to deep red cherries. Resists cracking and is moderately disease resistant. 

Red cherries on a branch with leaves.

 

Cherry – Lapins 

Small cherry, grows to 18 feet. Delicious cherries are ready in early summer and are good for fresh eating and baking. 

Dark purple cherries.
Photo & information credit: NetPS Plant Finder

 

Cherry – Evans  

Compact tree size, with a height of 15 feet and a spread of 10 feet. It as a low canopy. In the spring the tree is often covered in lots of white blossoms resulting in plenty of bright red sour cherries in the summer. This is a self-pollinating variety. 

Red cherries on a branch.
Photo & information credit: NetPS Plant Finder

 

Cherry – Rainier  

The Rainier Cherry tree is a popular fruit tree with showy white flowers in spring followed by sweet golden-yellow cherries with a reddish blush; needs full sun, well-drained soil, and a pollinator. This tree will grow to a height and spread of 25 feet. 

Cherries on a branch with leaves.
Photo & information credit: NetPS Plant Finder 

 

Cherry – Van  

A popular and large fruit tree, smothered in showy white flowers in spring followed by sweet dark red cherries, tall and upright, best for larger landscapes; needs full sun, well-drained soil and a pollinator. Grows to have a height and spread of 40 feet. Excellent to use for eating fresh, cooking, baking, and preserves.   

Red cherries.
Photo & information credit: NetPS Plant Finder 

Fig – Brown Turkey 

Small tree, grows to 20 feet. An attractive deciduous garden tree producing exceptional, tasty, brownish purple fruits with pink-amber flesh that ripen in early summer; attracts birds; needs hot exposure to ripen fruit in cooler areas 

A fig.
Photo & information credit: NetPS Plant Finder

 

Fig – Chicago hardy 

Noted for having unusually good winter hardiness, this variety can be maintained as a large shrub in cooler areas with some winter protection; sweet purplish-red fruit in fall, in clusters among interesting lobed leaves; also a great container plant. Grows to be about 20 feet in height and spread.  

Green figs.
Photo & information credit: NetPS Plant Finder

 

Fig – Olympian 

This tree produces a purple stripped fruit that is great for fresh eating. This variety is particularly cold-hardy and well suited for our cool and coastal climate. Height reaching 8 – 12 feet. 

A purple green fig.

Photo & info credit: One Green World 

Magnolia – Blushing Belle 

A vigorous, upright hybrid with large, soft-pink flowers. The hardiness of ‘Yellow Bird’ is combined with the large flowers of ‘Caerhays Belle’. 

A pink flower.
Photo & information credit: Reimer's Nursery

 

Magnolia – Butterflies 

Phil Savage’s most notable hybrid is patented ‘Butterflies’. Considered to be the most superior form of yellow today, this magnolia has a much deeper color than ‘Elizabeth’ and is quite cold-hardy. Neat growing, upright tree with intermediate sized flowers will soon become one of the most popular magnolia hybrids. Reaches 20 feet. 

Yellow flowers on a branch.
Photo & information credit: Reimer's Nursery

 

Magnolia – Coates 

A favorite soulangiana is ‘Coates’ with its spectacular spring display. Saucer-shaped flowers are deep lavender on the outside and white on the inside. Even young trees put on a flowering show. Its habit is upright and round. This low-branching medium growing clone will eventually reach 25′. 

A light pink flower.
Photo & information credit: Reimer's Nursery

 

Magnolia – Helen  

5m in height after 10 years. Flowers 24cm in diameter that are red-purple, shading to pink towards the centre. 

Information credit: Reimer's Nursery

No photo available. 

 

Magnolia – Kobus 

Small to medium, deciduous tree native to Japan. Known for being a multi-stemmed magnolia with a broad, rounded shape. Leaves are large (7–20 cm long), dark green, pointed at both ends and obovate (like an upside-down teardrop). Brown spots cover twigs. Mature bark is grey-brown. Mature height to 30′. 

A white flower.
Photo & information credit: Reimer's Nursery

 

Magnolia – Robinson   

Grows to 4m tall after 10 years. Star-shaped, pink flowers. Similar to Leonard Messel (photo below). 

A pink flower.
Photo & information credit: Reimer's Nursery

 

Magnolia – Rosemarie 

Multi-stemmed deciduous tree with an oval form. Can maintained as a large shrub or small tree. Blooms in spring with lots of rose-pink, fragrant, cup-shaped flowers. Relatively low maintenance. Mature height to 20 feet with a low canopy. 

Two pink flowers.
Photo & information credit: NetPS Plant Finder

 

Magnolia – Sun Sprite 

Highly columnar, M. ‘Sun Sprite’ is perfect for the modern compact garden. The 8-inch light yellow flowers with rose striping emerge only after the early frosts have gone. Fragrant and hardy. Mature height to 30 feet. 

A yellow flower.
Photo & information credit: Reimer's Nursery

 

Magnolia – Sunsation 

Introduced by August Kehr, this well-shaped, narrow growing tree has 7-inch yellow blooms with a rose-pink base, opening just before the leaves emerge making for an exciting color display. ‘Sunsation’ is a repeat bloomer extending the show for a period of weeks. Flowers at an early age. Grows pyramidally to 30 feet. 

A yellow-white flower.
Photo & information credit: Reimer's Nursery

 

Magnolia – Yoda  

Small to medium tree with a compact, upright habit. Long, pinkish-purple, pointed buds opening to spectacular, lotus-like blooms of palest pink to pure white, with a darker base. ‘Yoda’ is very similar to, but smaller than, well-known Magnolia ‘Star Wars’. It is also extremely free-flowering and repeat blooms in summer. 

A pink flower.
Photo credit & information credit: Kiwi Flora

Peach – Frost 

Enjoy large freestone peaches that have an attractive red blush over a yellow background. Its yellow juicy flesh has an excellent sweet flavour. The Frost peach is resistant to peach leaf curl. Self-pollinating. 

Peaches on a branch.
Photo credit: Nigel Kay

 

Peach – Glohaven 

A late ripening selection, presenting showy pink flowers in spring, followed by large, golden yellow freestone peaches that are blushed with red, with sweet yellow flesh; susceptible to late spring freezes and disease, needs full sun and well-drained soil. This tree reaches 20 feet tall and spreads 15 feet wide. The peaches are versatile and commonly used for cooking, baking, preserves, canning, and eating fresh. 

A peach.
Photo & information credit: NetPS Plant Finder

 

Peach – Redhaven 

Small tree that produces firm, juicy reddish peaches that are typically ready for picking in mid-summer. Pink flowers in spring. Needs full sun and well-drained soil. Grows to be about 20 feet tall with a spread of 25 feet. 

A peach on a branch.
Photo & information credit: NetPS Plant Finder

 

Peach – Reliance 

Considered to be one of the hardiest peach varieties, this tree has beautiful pink flowers in the spring and juicy freestone peaches in the summer. The tree is relatively small, with a round shape, growing to 20 feet at maturity with a spread of 25 feet. 

A peach.

 

Peach – Veteran  

Does well in full sun. Maximum height and spread is 15 feet. This tree produces delicious fruit that people commonly use for canning or eating fresh. Fruit has golden yellow skin with red blush.  

Two peaches on a branch.

 

Nectarine – Flavourtop 

An exceptional selection, producing large, freestone nectarines with great flavor, smooth red skin, and sweet yellow flesh; high yield with excellent vigor; susceptible to late spring freezes and disease, needs full sun and well-drained soil. Grows to a height and spread of 20 feet. Fruits from these trees are used for preserves, canning, and eating fresh. 

A peach.
Photo & information credit: NetPS Plant Finder

 

Nectarine – Hardy Red 

A fine yet fickle fruit tree, bearing sweet, juicy reddish-yellow nectarines in mid-summer; freestone; very showy pink flowers in spring; low, spreading habit; susceptible to late spring freezes and disease, needs full sun and well-drained soil. Grow to a height of 20 feet and spreads 25 feet. The fruits from these trees are used for cooking, baking, preserves, canning, and eating fresh.   

A tree with peaches.
Photo & information credit: NetPS Plant Finder

Pear – Anjou 

Larger tree, can grow to 45 feet. Produces high quality firm green pears, well known for fresh eating, cooking, and baking. Enjoy white flowers in early spring. 

Green pears on a tree.
Photo & information credit: NetPS Plant Finder 

 

Pear – Bartlett 

The most commercially popular pear. Produces excellent quality yellow-green fruit in early fall; very showy white flowers in spring and an upright oval habit, very ornamental; needs a pollinator, fallen fruit can be messy, can be susceptible to fireblight. A very large tree that grows up to 45 feet tall and spreads 30 feet. Common uses include cooking, baking, juice-making, canning, and eating fresh. 

A row of pear trees in an orchard.
Photo & information credit: NetPS Plant Finder 

 

Pear – Bosc 

Dense tree with an upright spread. A popular fruit tree with yellow pears with russet skins. This tree does require a high level of care and upkeep. Height of 45 feet and a spread of 30 feet. 

Pears on a branch.
Photo & information credit: NetPS Plant Finder 

 

Pear – Clapps Favorite 

Large tree with medium-sized pears that have a sweet taste and juicy texture. Grows to 45 feet with a spread of 35 feet. 

A pear.
Photo credit: Silver Creek Nursery   

 

Pear – Comice 

Produces large fruit that is round to pear shaped with thick skin. Pears have a superb flavor and texture. Ripen in late summer. 

A pear.

 

Pear – Conference 

Long, firm light green pears with a sweet taste and firm texture. Grows to 45 feet, with a spread of 30 feet. 

Pears on a branch.
Photo & information credit: NetPS Plant Finder 

 

Pear – Flemish Beauty 

This large-growing fruit tree features very showy white flowers in spring, and tasty yellow pears with a red blush in late summer; has an upright oval habit, very ornamental; needs a pollinator, fallen fruit can be messy; susceptible to fireblight. A very large tree that grows up to 45 feet tall and spreads 30 feet. Common uses include cooking, baking, canning, and eating fresh. 

Pears.
Photo & information credit: NetPS Plant Finder 

 

Pear – Golden Spice 

This home orchard tree features showy white flowers in spring, good fall color and consistent oval shape; small firm yellow fruit is of reasonable quality, best for canning; fallen fruit can be messy, but self-pollinating and very resistant to fireblight. Grows to be about 30 feet tall and spreads 25 feet. Common uses include cooking, baking, canning, and eating fresh. 

A tree in front of a home.
Photo & information credit: NetPS Plant Finder 

 

Pear – Highland 

A sturdy fruit tree which produces large, firm yellow fruit with a reddish-brown blush in fall; very showy white flowers in spring; needs a pollinator, fallen fruit can be messy, can be susceptible to fireblight. At maturity this tree will grow 40 feet tall with a 30 feet spread. Common uses include cooking, baking, juice-making, and eating fresh. 

A pear hanging off of a branch.
Photo & information credit: NetPS Plant Finder 

 

Pear – Summer Crisp 

One of the hardiest pears with clouds of showy white flowers in spring, good fall color and a consistent oval form; small firm greenish-red fruit, reasonable quality, good flavor; fallen fruit can be messy, but self-pollinating and resistant to fireblight. At its largest height, the tree will be 25 feet tall and have a 20 feet spread. Common uses include cooking, baking, preserves, canning, and eating fresh. 

Red pears on a tree.
Photo & information credit: NetPS Plant Finder 

Beech – Fagus sylvatica 

Medium to large, deciduous tree native to Europe. Leaves are simple, elliptical, alternate, and have a slight shimmer. Leaf edges are wavy. The bark is smooth and grey resembling elephant skin. Depending on the specific species, leaves may be dark green or dark purple. 

A tree in a field.

 

Black Tupelo – Nyssa sylvatica  

A deciduous tree that will grow to 40 feet at maturity. The pointy leaves turn an eye-catching crimson in the fall. It is a good choice for attracting birds to your yard. 

A red-orange tree.
Photo & information credit: NetPS Plant Finder

 

Fringe Tree – Chionanthis v. Spring Fleecing 

A multi-stemmed deciduous tree with a generally rounded form. The tree has white strap-like flowers that are fragrant. Grows up to 20 feet at maturity, has a spread of up to 20 feet, with a low canopy. 

A small tree with green leaves.
Photo & information credit: NetPS Plant Finder

 

Gingko – Mariken 

This is a multi-stemmed deciduous shrub with a rough round form. This is a dwarf ginkgo tree with distinct fan-shaped leaves. Height reaches 24 inches, with a spread of 30 inches. 

A small tree with green leaves.
Photo & information credit: NetPS Plant Finder

 

Hornbeam – Dwarf Columnar  

A dense dwarf variety with excellent form and few troubles; columnar habit makes it great for smaller landscapes; takes pruning very well and can make a fantastic hedge. It has a beautiful foliage that reaches 10 feet tall and spreads about 4 feet.  

A tall tree with green leaves.
Photo & information credit: NetPS Plant Finder

 

Maple – Japanese ‘Bloodgood’ 

Possibly the most popular of all feature trees for the home landscape, with rich burgundy-purple palm-shaped foliage all season long and a very artistic spreading growth habit; put it in the front yard and give it lots of room to grow. Grows to a height and spread of about 20 feet. 

A tree with dark purple leaves.
Photo & information credit: NetPS Plant Finder

 

Stewartia pseudocamellia 

This tree makes a great accent, with beautiful white flowers in mid-summer, bright red leaves in the fall and showy bark in the winter1 It is a rather sensitive plant, needing shelter from wind and high quality soil. Height 40 feet with a spread of 30 feet. 

A tree with green leaves.
Photo & information credit: NetPS Plant Finder

Tree Care

Learn more from the International Society of Arboriculture on planting a tree in your backyard and remember to water your trees regularly to keep them growing and healthy. 

Questions?

For help placing your order, call 604-501-5050.

For general inquiries, cancellations, and refunds, email stewardship@surrey.ca. Please include your order number if you have placed an order.